Hours of the Stars
Dimitris Liantinis

"I've come to know of Dimitris Liantinis the academic, philosopher, writer, translator and poet only the last five years. He's the man whose system of ideas was greatly influenced by the philosophy of Ancient Greece as well as the ideals of the Romantics and the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. In reference to the scientific achievements of his time and especially in the realm of cosmology he attempted to formulate a connection between it and questions concerning the existence and nature of God. He wrote extensively about education, his own field and some of his writings focus on what he saw as the moral and intellectual decline of modern Greeks when compared to their glorious ancestors." ~ Manolis


Betsi Larousse
Louis Hamelin

You’re thirteen years old and boarding school is a prison that teaches nothing but dead knowledge. Heart filled with gloom and turmoil, you escape to the bay of your childhood, to your three pines and the soothing sounds of Nature. But you share a dark secret with your father. You know you have to face life, but haven’t a clue how. And you don’t believe those who say everything will change from now on, that we’ll soon be masters in our own house. You’re pinned to the floor by the grave certainty everything’s over before it started. Fortunately, you have friends who understand the depths of your anguish, and hours of solitude you spend reading and dreaming. Entranced by a book painting the Laurentian flora, you write your first poems, you discover words you suspect will make you free someday. And you discover music that rekindles your hopes, confidence and desires. Filled with poetic and sensual metaphors, What Will I Become Until I Die is a stunning portrait of adolescence, of its doubts and sudden flashes of anger. A glowing panegyric to Nature, it’s the key to understanding Robert Lalonde’s literary work.